‘Winning Wimbledon will be a good way to end Roger Federer’s career’, feels Boris Becker

Former Wimbledon winner, Boris Becker shares his views on how Federer can end his career on a high.

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Roger Federer
Roger Federer

Ever since Roger Federer suffered an injury to his knee last year, post the Australian Open, plenty of theories and speculations have been floating about the future of the great Swiss. The 20-time Grand Slam winner only returned to tennis after a long hiatus in Doha a month ago, where he was dumped by Nikoloz Basilashvili in the quarters.

While, the 39-year-old was due for a return in Madrid for the clay season, he has now altered his schedule yet again. Federer recently confirmed, he will play his home tournament in Geneva, before travelling to Paris for the French Open. However, as far as grass court season goes, Federer is fully committed to the lawns in- Halle and Wimbledon, where he is a multiple champion.

It is no secret that Federer’s chances of excelling and winning tournaments on grass is more likely than elsewhere. Therefore, we will see the maestro once again enthrall us all with his skill set.

Plenty has also be written and talked about on Federer’s impending retirement. Many experts have also expressed their views on how a winning swan-song at the All England Club would be fitting way to end his career.

Federer has a great chance to win Wimbledon

Roger Federer
Roger Federer

Throwing more light, former Wimbledon winner, Boris Becker told 24 Matins,

He said: “I hope Federer doesn’t make the mistake of playing a lot of tournaments for the heck of it. He is an absolute icon and has lifted tennis to another level. Roger needs a good end to his career. He has chances to go far at Wimbledon”

The World No.8 has already won the Championships on eight occasions and if he can spend quality time on the court, coupled with adequate match practice, Federer will once again be a firm favourite at SW19.

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