India vs Australia: New Year’s Pink Test in Sydney to go ahead with ‘virtual seats’ amid widespread COVID-19 outbreaks

The 'virtual seats' will be painted pink and will bear the donor’s name in capital letters.

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Glenn McGrath presented Australia team with Baggy Pink caps (Credits - Cricket Australia)
Glenn McGrath presented Australia team with Baggy Pink caps (Credits – Cricket Australia)

Widespread COVID-19 outbreak in the state of New South Wales saw the crowd capacity being reduced to 25% at the SCG for the third Test. Yet the Jane McGrath Foundation is all set to paint the iconic venue pink for the New Year’s Test. Despite the cut down in the crowd, which was at 50% to start with, the McGrath Foundation is still hopeful of raising $1 million at the Pink Test to support its breast care nurses.

Owing to the border restrictions and crowd cap, the charitable foundation is planning a virtual campaign this year. The Foundation is selling virtual seats at the ground for $20, with each seat purchased to be coloured pink with the donor’s name printed across it in capital letters. Yesterday, the Australian side was presented with Baggy Pink caps which they will be donning for the Pink Test.

What is the Pink Test initiative

Tim Paine, Josh Hazlewood and David Warner flaunting the 'Baggy Pink' cap
Tim Paine, Josh Hazlewood and David Warner flaunting the ‘Baggy Pink’ cap

The tradition of the Pink Test started back in 2009 and the money raised during the Test will go to the McGrath Foundation. The Jane McGrath Foundation is a breast cancer support and education charity in Australia established by the legendary Glenn McGrath in memory of his late wife. The foundation raises to place McGrath Breast Care Nurses in communities across the country and also works towards increasing awareness about the disease.

The third day of the Test is called the Jane McGrath day. Fans turn up in pink and even the stumps used are pink in colour. Even some of the players use pink on their gears to support the cause. The home side even flaunts the Baggy Pink caps instead of the traditional Baggy Green to support the initiative. The first time Sydney hosted a Pink Test in 2009 when Australia took on South Africa. Since then, the tradition has continued and once again this year both teams will come together for a cause.

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