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Protein-Rich Vegetables

Proteins help your body with a number of important functions and helps you maintain muscle mass. Protein is crucial in any diet, especially for athletes and those trying to lose weight.

Protein-Rich Vegetables

It’s important to include healthy sources of protein in your diet each day and this article tells some of the protein-rich vegetables.

Proteins help your body with a number of important functions and helps you maintain muscle mass.

Protein is crucial in any diet, especially for athletes and those trying to lose weight.

It’s essential for building and maintaining muscle mass, keeping you feeling full between meals, and ensuring that every cell in your body is operating properly.

The best plant-based sources of protein include tofu, chickpeas, and peanuts, which are classed as legumes.

That said, some vegetables can offer a good protein boost per calorie thus becoming protein-rich vegetables.

Some of the examples of protein-rich vegetables are,

Edamame

It has 18.46 grams per cup (prepared from frozen) of protein content.

If you normally only eat edamame at your local sushi restaurant, it’s time to start enjoying it at home.

It’s packed with healthy plant protein, vitamins, and minerals.

Lentils

Total protein: 17.86 grams per cup (boiled).

Lentils aren’t technically a vegetable, they’re actually a pulse found in the legume family.

But you won’t find a better option when it comes to an inexpensive, readily available vegetarian-friendly protein.

They’re rich in folate, potassium, and copper, making them even healthier than the grains that they can replace.

Watercress

Watercress is a cruciferous plant that grows in water. It is high in protein per calorie.

One cup of watercress contains 85 micrograms (mcg) of vitamin K. This is an important vitamin for blood and bone health.

Watercress is a rich source of vitamin C, a powerful antioxidant, and it also contains B vitamins, calcium, potassium, and vitamin A.

Chickpeas

Total protein: 14.53 grams per cup (boiled from dried).

Chickpeas, also known as garbanzo beans, are a main ingredient in hummus.

They have a subtle, nutty flavor that works well in a variety of dishes.

They’re able to transform into almost anything, from rich falafel to crunchy, baked snacks.

They’re especially good whole inside soups, salads, and even crepes.

Spinach

Spinach is one of the most nutrient-dense leafy green vegetables a person can eat.

The protein in spinach contains all essential amino acids.

One cup of spinach contains 121 mcg of vitamin K, which is just over 100% of a person’s daily needs.

Spinach is also a rich source of folate, vitamin A, and vitamin C.

It is a good source of magnesium, iron, and potassium, and a decent source of calcium.

Lima Beans

Total protein: 11.58 grams per cup (boiled).

This little legume packs a nutritious punch with plenty of potassium, fiber, and iron.

While some people don’t like the taste, recipes like the ones below can help with that.

In addition to filling protein, lima beans contain the amino acid leucine, which may play a big role in healthy muscle synthesis among older people.

They’re especially good on their own—and you’ll probably love them more as an adult.

Mustard Greens

Mustard greens belong to the Brassica family. They are very similar to kale but have a distinct mustard flavor.

One cup also provides 144 mcg of vitamin K, which is more than 100% of a person’s daily needs.

They are a rich source of vitamin C and also contain calcium, potassium, and B vitamins. They are also a good source of vitamin E.

Mustard greens, like many other plants, contain phenolic compounds that give them antioxidant properties.

Also Read: Best Food Sources of Vitamin-C